AUDIOTORY PROCESSING DIFFICULTY

  • APD refers to how the central nervous system uses auditory information

    • It is a disconnect between how sounds are heard and how they are processed

  • APD is NOT the result of higher-order cognitive, language, or related disorders

    • However, makes it difficult for a child to process verbal instructions or even filter out background noises in the classroom

  • There is a breakdown in receiving, remembering, understanding, and using auditory information

  • Hearing ability is adequate

  • The child’s ability to listen is impaired

SIGNS OF APD

  • Symptoms as if  hearing loss is present:

    • Understanding speech in noisy environments

    • Discriminating (telling the difference between) similar-sounding speech sounds

    • Mishearing information

    • Problems attending to oral messages

  • Problems following directions

  • Often ask for repetition or clarification

  • Distracted by background noises

  • Difficulty in remembering what they hear

  • Difficulties with spelling, reading and understanding information presented verbally

  • Auditory processing determines language mastery, which impacts:

  • Learning – listening accuracy and comprehension

  • Reading – a language skill

  • Social interaction

  • Thinking – internal dialog uses language

WHAT PARTS OF LEARNING DOES APD AFFECT?